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Fresh Finds IV

February 15, 2016
Photo Credit @Said Dagdeviren

I wanted to share the inspirational work of artist Said Dagdeviren from Istanbul as he shares a powerful message of nature, wildlife, and preservation. We all leave a footprint behind, what’s your legacy?


Photo Credit @Said Dagdeviren

Photo Credit @Said Dagdeviren

Photo Credit @ said-dagdeviren

Photo Credit @ Said Dagdeviren

Photo Credit @ Said Dagdeviren

Photo Credit | Said Dagdeviren




Productivity Tips from Top Designers

January 30, 2016
Photo credit @jennetsaitquoi!

It’s the end of January…the energetic oomph of the new year is starting to fade. I know for myself, I’m still just as determined to accomplish my goals but the motivation level is starting to lag. Good news! Top productivity tips from the best entrepreneurs and designers to get you motived and pushing the envelope of design and life in general.


1 | Jot It Down

“I have my sketchbook on me at all times. Sketching helps me to externalize the craziness going on in my head, allowing me to see a clearer path of what to move forward with.”
—Leah Shea, product designer at ustwo


Photo credit:

Photo credit: ustwo


2 | Quality over Quantity

“You want to be productive? Focus. Do one amazing thing each day. It could be for the world, your life, your partner, or for a friend. But if you do one great thing a day, well, that’s a f***ing productive day.”
—Golden Krishna, senior UX designer, Zappos


3 | Little by Little

“I found breaking down big goals into smaller tasks to be the best way for me to get things done. I can make small progress and knock off these bite-size tasks whenever I have a moment.”
 —Jannie Lai, head of UX, Light


Photo credit @

Photo credit: Light

4 | Strategize

“A lot of time can be wasted in pursuit of the wrong goal. The longer I have worked as a designer, the more I have learned establishing that you are working on the right thing from the beginning, not just working, boosts productivity. Sure, in the moment, time spent asking yourself, ‘Am I working on the right thing?’ makes you feel anxious, but it’s worth it.”
—Jared Ficklin, Argo Design


photo credit @
Photo credit: Argo Design


5 | Take a Step Outside

“Many of my design ideas and strategies came from my showers or evening walks.”
 —Jannie Lai, head of UX, Light


6 | Let Yourself Off the Hook

“It’s hard to tear myself away, especially when I’m stuck and I’m starting to get get anxious, but it helps ground me and puts me in a better mood if I take a moment to do something I enjoy. Instead of trying to get inspired by looking at Dribbble, or other apps, I look at something completely different. For example, I love mid-century furniture. So I’ll go on my favorite sites, Instagram accounts, Etsy, and look at beautiful mid-century furniture and accessories. I also love to cook, so I’ll go to my favorite YouTube channels and watch a couple videos. ”
—Addy Beavers, UX designer, Google Play


7 | One for the Home Team

“Think about all your haters and the people who don’t believe in you. That’s a huge motivator, as well as thinking about how good it feels to see something you made in the world. Focus on the ends and the means become easier.”
 —Ryder Ripps, creative director, OKFocus



Guest Artist Interview – Kristen Williams

November 8, 2015

I have an exciting new guest interview to share with you all! It’s my privilege to introduce local designer Kristen Williams from Pueblo, CO.

Check out our interview together and visit more of her work from the links below.

Website | Blog


1. Tell us a little about yourself and how did you get into graphic design?

I was always artistically inclined. As a tiny child, I loved to draw and paint and when I turned five I finally got my hands on my mom’s Pentax SLR. I was drawn to typography and fell in love with the Egyptian typeface on my mom’s antique typewriter. I always noticed the logos on my toys. I think I was doomed from a very early age to be an artist and graphic designer.

It almost didn’t happen though. My family didn’t understand the difference between commercial and fine artists and I think they feared the “starving artist” stereotype. Wanting the best for me, they encouraged me to pursue other fields ranging from math, to aeronautical engineering and finally journalism, which is what they sent me to college to obtain. If it weren’t for a passing comment from my advisor that I could double major in graphic design, I’d probably be working at a newspaper right now. Ironically, journalism is far lower paying than graphic design, so I focused on my BFA and switched my journalism to the more complimentary integrated communications. I’ve never looked back since.

Photo credit @Kristen Williams


2. Describe your style/aesthetic and where do you draw inspiration from?

My style fluctuates a bit depending on my client’s needs, but it’s usually somewhere between eclectic retro, hipster and grunge on a Swiss modern structure. I’m a 90’s child and so grunge is a dominating influence, but I’m also inspired by 1960s advertising, halftones, drawing, printmaking and the colors of local Hispanic and Latin-American paintings. I’m in love with the contemporary Argentinian graphic design circuit as I see them working with the same influences—60s halftones, 90s grunge and contemporary Latin-American colors. There’s also a kinship in our environments and graphic design goals as I too am trying to use these in-your-face graphics to take a stand and promote change for Pueblo, Colorado.

Pueblo is my second home. I go to school here, met my best friends here, and I spend most of my free time here. Local leaders are trying to raise Pueblo to a cultural hot-spot and shake away the steel-mill roots and the 80s depression that crippled Pueblo. What was once a Victorian hot-spot for health and mineral water, the location of a Frank Lloyd Wright opera house and the home of gilded, marbled hotels became associated only with the dirt of working-class industry. This town has come so far, made so much progress, but people in other parts of Colorado (or other parts of the US) still over-look it.

We local graphic designers are trying to provide the visual component to revitalization campaigns, and so rebel graphics resonate with many of us. I’m one of them. Currently I am a designer at the Historic Arkansas Riverwalk of Pueblo, a down-town venue that is one of the fore-runners of Pueblo’s revitalization projects. The Riverwalk has already made major improvements in beatifying Pueblo (it ranks comparable to my favorite spots in San Francisco). My job is to help lead the charge of a fresh visual identity system that will make people remember the Riverwalk fondly and thereby remember Pueblo fondly. The goal is to help people see Pueblo as a thriving cultural and arts center, and forget the long-gone steel-mill past. My love for bright, in-your-face colors and rebel graphics that scream for attention are now a necessary inspiration for my job.


Photo Credit @Kristen Williams


3. Walk us through a typical day.

A truly typical day almost doesn’t exist for me, especially while I’m juggling my last full-time semester of college and two internships. But there are some things I can expect (mostly!). When I walk into the office, I either immediately deal with an unexpected challenge that arose while I was away at class (such as a rush job), or I can go straight to my desk and work on my projects. I like to start the day researching the project, brainstorming the design direction and researching related design trends (as both an example of what to follow or to avoid).

The rest of the day is spent collaborating with copywriters, communications directors, the printers, my boss and anyone else assigned to the project. Graphic design is a lot to juggle, but that’s also what makes it exciting. It’s not like the fine arts where I lock myself into the studio for hours on end, drawing compositions to meet a gallery deadline. Instead, it is a collaborative, back-and-forth effort. Sometimes things change, sometimes I might lose favorite elements in pursuit of the greater goal (or the client’s specific desires), but almost always the project is richer for it. You can’t expect to have a lot of control in graphic design—instead you have to be ready to adapt to change, and quickly.




4. What are some of your favorite pastimes?

I love pastimes that inspire my design, or let me take a break from it. I’ll stroll antique stores in search of vintage graphics or walk the down-town streets of small towns for mural and sign inspiration. My photography is also a great way to decompress and reflect. When I lift up my camera, nothing else exists in the world but me and my subject. It’s complete Zen.

Sometimes I need to take a break from anything visual arts to avoid overstimulation and during this time I’ll focus on spending time with my friends, taking a stroll in nature or watching equestrian sports. There’s something awe-inspiring about watching a man and a horse soar over a five-foot jump in perfect partnership. Thinking about what they had to go through over several years to obtain that level of strength and finesse puts all of my graphic design challenges into perspective. And, in a way, equestrian show jumping represents graphic design—you need strength, confidence and delicacy to clear major obstacles. The jumps look formable, but they are actually delicate–make a mistake and suddenly that jump crumbles and you are out of the competition. I can’t think of a better analogy for graphic design.


Photo credit @Kristen Williams


5. Any advice for future/aspiring new designers?

Never lose sight of the bigger picture, the end goal of the project, and your client’s needs. These are the most important things and if you meet them, you’ll never go hungry. There are going to be times when you will have to stand your ground and defend your design aesthetics, but that is only when you KNOW that the design aesthetics are the best to meet the client’s goals. If they don’t meet the goals, then the aesthetics are just your babies and you’ll have to let them go.

Be ready to juggle multiple projects and a lot of little details, many of which will change as the project progresses. This is what makes commercial art different from the fine arts—it’s not about you spending hours on your favorite image until you’re done. In order to please multiple people and communicate a message, you’ll have to juggle a team of people and roll with the changes. Learn to multi-task and always welcome change. Be like that show jumping horse and rider where your talents are your trusty steed. Always have confidence, always look to the next obstacle (not down), know when to use strength and when to be delicate. Nothing can stop you if you learn that.

Thanks again! Photo credits @Kristen Williams



Hit Refresh

November 2, 2015
Photo Credit @battery_full

Hello good people! Hope you all had a great weekend, I took a short trip to the mountains today to get away from life, the city, my house…needless to say it was perfect and just what I needed to feel refreshed for a new week.

Speaking of refreshed, I thought it was about time for some good, old fashion typography inspiration. I love all things type, therefore; I found far too many examples to fit in one post so I’ll have to try to narrow things down. Enjoy!



Photo credit @battery_full



Photo credit @Luke Ritchie




Photo credit @Multiple Owners




Photo credit @Anton Brumistrov



Photo credit @Multiple Owners


Photo credit @Hanna Viktorsson


Photo credit @Jeff Rogers


Guest Artist Interview – Dave Hamann

October 7, 2015
Photo Credit@ Dave Hamann

Hello good people! I have some very exciting new interviews to share this month in continuation of local artist/designer spotlights. Tonight, it’s my privilege to introduce local photographer Dave Hamann from Colorado Springs, CO.

Take a look at our interview together and feel free check at more of his work from the links below.

Website | Behance


1. Tell us a little about yourself and how did you get into photography?

Like many photographers, my interest in photography started when I was young.  My grandfather was an amateur photographer who seemed always attached to a camera.  He bought me my first camera, a Pentax ME SE Super.  From there, my desire to capture great photos and master this new craft blossomed and I quickly found myself devouring the photographic series by Ansel Adams, The Camera, The Negative, and The Print. Invaluable reading for the novice photographer.


2. When did you start freelancing and how do you like it compared to industry work?

I started freelancing soon after graduating college.  Initially I began as a food photographer for local chefs.  I loved it!  I love a good still life and food photography is about as complex and challenging as they come.  I turned nearly full time art photography when we moved to Colorado. The landscape draws you in!




3. Walk us through a typical day.

A typical day is unfortunately not very exciting!  If the weather is cooperative, by that I mean moody and brooding with great clouds and the hint of a threatening storm, I will grab the camera and head outdoors (kids and wife permitting!).  Otherwise, I’m in the studio arranging some awesome looking vegetables or fruits I found on a run to the grocery store in some vain attempt to emulate the still life style of the old Dutch Masters!




4. Describe your style/aesthetic and where do you draw your inspiration?

Landscapes I’m 98% black and white.  I come from a black and white wet darkroom tradition and still believe that the absence of color in an image makes the viewer “see” the scene.  We see color all the time and removing that reference makes one rely on the line, texture, shape, and tones of an image – makes one “see”.  For my still life work I’m all “Dutch Master”, XVII century still life.  I am also a fan of photographer Paulette Tavormina’s work.



5. What are some of your favorite pastimes?

I love photography.  If I could, I’d love to hike into the backcountry for two or three months somewhere in Montana or Idaho, or even here in Colorado and just photograph!  That being said, I do like cooking and watching cartoons with the kids!


Thanks again!
Photo credits: Dave Hamann.